Plenary session: BILCAP and dichotomania

Disclosure: the BILCAP trial was run by the unit where I currently work, though I had no involvement in it. Plenary Session podcast number 1.52 (here) was about the BILCAP trial (Capecitabine compared with observation in resected biliary tract cancer (BILCAP): a randomised, controlled, multicentre, phase 3 study), which was published recently in Lancet Oncology.  … Continue reading Plenary session: BILCAP and dichotomania

Comments on “Negative trials in critical care: why most research is probably wrong”

This paper, in which John Laffey and Brian Kavanagh discuss some of the issues in critical care trials, was published recently in Lancet Respiratory Diseases.  Their main point, which seems sound, is that one of the reasons for the large number of "negative" (urgh) trials in critical care is that conditions that conditions that trials … Continue reading Comments on “Negative trials in critical care: why most research is probably wrong”

New England Journal of Medicine for the last time

Sorry for going on yet again about the New England Journal of Medicine, but I recently had the experience of publishing a trial there (this one) and interacting with their statistical guidelines, which I have discussed before (here and here). The issue about p-values for baseline characteristics came up, of course.  Here's what came back … Continue reading New England Journal of Medicine for the last time